Stories by Alan Guebert

About Alan

Alan Guebert was raised on an 800-acre, 100-cow southern Illinois dairy farm. After graduation from the University of Illinois in 1980, he served as a writer and editor at Professional Farmers of America, Successful Farming magazine and Farm Journal magazine. His syndicated agricultural column, The Farm and Food File, began in June, 1993, and now appears weekly in more than 70 publications throughout the U.S. and Canada. He and spouse Catherine, a social worker, have two adult children. farmandfoodfile.com

U.S. energy policy never been decent

Thursday, September 29, 2005

Of all the lessons beaten into America by crashing Katrina, one of the biggest is that the nation’s energy policy, past as well as present, is an absolute scandal.

It’s time to restock the national pantry

Thursday, September 22, 2005

More than most months, September delivers farmers key numbers – yield per acre, weaning weight, price per pound or bushel – they will live with for the coming months.

Katrina’s agricultural effects are secondary to summer drought’s

Thursday, September 15, 2005

As Hurricane Katrina’s smashing blows fell on the Gulf Coast, commodity traders did what they always do when uncertainty hits the pits: They sold.

Summer’s end is filled with yellow

Thursday, September 8, 2005

The end of central Illinois’ heat-stoked, rain-starved summer is being whispered in the yellow leaves rattling on my backyard’s black walnut trees.

Court piles on meatpackers’ power

Thursday, September 1, 2005

Killed the Packers and Stockyards Act of 1921. Largely gutted the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s mandate to “promote fair and competitive trading practices for the overall benefit of consumers and American agriculture.

Einstein influences federal budget

Thursday, August 25, 2005

While Albert Einstein proposed the theory of relativity nearly a century ago, today’s Congress and White House have perfected its application.

What voters want in farm policy

Thursday, August 18, 2005

Baseball has its winter hot-stove league when teams and players wheel and deal in hopes of improving their World Series chances.

D.C. sausage grinder running wild

Thursday, August 11, 2005

In its rush to blow out of steamy Washington D.C. for a month of cooler temperatures and cooler tempers, Congress ran the legislative meat grinder hard in the final days of July to crank out enough fat-laden sausage to sate even the hungriest special interest.

Uncle Honey: dangerous, but sweet

Thursday, August 4, 2005

The last week of July and first week of August were always the longest and hottest weeks of the year on the southern Illinois’ farm of my youth.

Dairy farmers mooch it up in Maine

Thursday, July 28, 2005

Most freelance writers are born moochers.
With no corporate travel budget behind them and a flood-or-dust income stream in front of them, the art of mooching – traveling, dining, drinking and vacationing on other peoples’ tabs – quickly becomes a way of life.

Eminent domain decision: no shock, and qualified, if you follow history

Thursday, July 21, 2005

To hear the major newspapers and farm groups tell it, the world of private property rights collapsed June 23.

Reporter moves to different ‘beat’

Thursday, July 14, 2005

Hemingway went to Paris to discover, he once explained, if “I could write two good sentences.”
While there, however, Papa wrote two good books, The Sun Also Rises and Farewell to Arms.

Farm and Food File: Mad over mad cow disease testing

Thursday, July 7, 2005

Once, while researching the amount of grain the USDA’s Commodity Credit Corp. had in storage, I hit the brick-solid bureaucratic wall of silence.

Why may ethanol be imported?

Thursday, June 30, 2005

The harder anyone scratches the Central American Free Trade Agreement pushed by the White House, the worse the smell in American agriculture gets.

Made in America? Yeah, right

Thursday, June 23, 2005

After a sip of (Brazilian) orange juice and a nibble of bacon (from a market hog farrowed in Canada), U.

Talking the truth about trade

Thursday, June 16, 2005

You know you’re far off the reality map when the American Farm Bureau’s former president, Iowan Dean Kleckner, publicly praises the Humane Society of the United States for its support of Central American Free Trade Agreement.

School’s in session across Potomac

Thursday, June 9, 2005

If you think schoolchildren dread summer school, consider the eight-week summer session agriculture’s friends in Congress face.

Supreme confusion over checkoff

Thursday, June 2, 2005

After the U.S. Supreme Court surprised both sides of the beef checkoff court fight May 23 by declaring the $80-million-per-year mandatory tax constitutional, opponents and proponents alike offered a dizzying display of spin.

Got debt? Milk giant downgraded

Thursday, May 26, 2005

The finances of Dairy Farmers of America are souring faster than cream in a July sun, according to a May 9 Moody’s Investors Service report.

Farmers’ windfall is breath of fresh air

Thursday, May 19, 2005

Standing atop the sweeping farm ridge 70 miles north of Berlin, the stiff wind off the Baltic Sea painted my cheeks apple red in minutes.

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