Stories by Alan Guebert

About Alan

Alan Guebert was raised on an 800-acre, 100-cow southern Illinois dairy farm. After graduation from the University of Illinois in 1980, he served as a writer and editor at Professional Farmers of America, Successful Farming magazine and Farm Journal magazine. His syndicated agricultural column, The Farm and Food File, began in June, 1993, and now appears weekly in more than 70 publications throughout the U.S. and Canada. He and spouse Catherine, a social worker, have two adult children. farmandfoodfile.com

Your turn: Some readers can really write

Thursday, May 12, 2005

Thirteen years ago this week a thin packet containing four agricultural columns hit the cluttered desks of 124 newspaper editors and publishers in 14 Midwestern states.

Broken promises of rural development

Thursday, May 5, 2005

It happened again the other week at a local public forum on agriculture.
The panel of speakers included me, two farmers and a state Farm Bureau economist.

Lessons from 22 tons of education

Thursday, April 28, 2005

Today’s Southern breeze gently rustles the heavy-headed tulips outside my office window before sweeping through the apple tree to sprinkle a shower of blossom petals onto an emerald lawn.

Farm groups captivated by CAFTA

Thursday, April 21, 2005

The Congressional battle to approve the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) began in earnest with the usual suspects mouthing the usual platitudes to the usual inside-the-Beltway audiences.

Don’t know much about ag econ?

Thursday, April 14, 2005

Had I known my professional life would center on chronicling the takeover of global ag business by global ag business, I would have listened more closely to Professor Lyle P.

MCP: Value-added, little gained

Thursday, April 7, 2005

The lessons contained in the proposed settlement of a civil lawsuit arising over

Cotton ruling is blow to exports

Thursday, March 31, 2005

You don’t own any cattle, so the court-clouded Canadian beef import rule doesn’t affect you, right?
Likewise, you don’t make fructose, raise sugar beets or grow cotton so all that mumbo-jumbo about NAFTA, CAFTA, TRIPS and the WTO is better left to those smart trade-talkers in Washington, Brussels and Geneva.

Free trade won’t feed the world

Thursday, March 24, 2005

The first hint of spring brings big iron and big irony to the winter-rested Illinois prairie.

Senate, judge kick USDA’s mad cow

Thursday, March 17, 2005

The scene, often repeated these bitterly political days, was straight out of Alice in Wonderland.
On March 3, U.

State ag directors take a whack at CAFTA and White House

Thursday, March 10, 2005

It was an embarrassing moment for the White House and its free trade acolytes.
There, hat-in-hand before the agriculture commissioners, secretaries and directors of each state and four U.

Grab attention: Show me the numbers

Thursday, March 3, 2005

The trick in getting farmers to read farm magazines, a long-time editor of mine repeatedly admonished, is to put numbers in the headline, the lead and every paragraph thereafter.

Trillion-dollar debt shapes budget, but Washington can’t blot red ink

Thursday, February 24, 2005

As the White House and Congress pout, parry and plot over the 2006 federal budget plan of President George W.

Budget’s math, politics don’t add up

Thursday, February 17, 2005

Presidential budget proposals usually are about two things, politics and mathematics. Both elements carry equal weight.

Agbiz’s sweet deal on EPA air regs

Thursday, February 10, 2005

For generations, U.S. meat and egg producers joked about the earthy aromas emanating from their farms.

Wise words from outgoing secretary

Thursday, February 3, 2005

By tradition, an outgoing president leaves just one item – a letter to the incoming president – on the Oval Office desk when departing the White House for the final time.

The most to lose: Social Security ‘reform’ to hit rural America hardest

Thursday, January 27, 2005

No American group has more to lose in Social Security reform than farmers, ranchers and other rural dwellers, according to USDA demographic and income data.

USDA’s mad cow circus: Act II

Thursday, January 20, 2005

After spending the last four years marrying the U.S. cattle market to Canada’s cattle market – the new family’s name is “the integrated North American beef market” – the USDA is now saddled with its handiwork.

USDA’s ‘mad cow’ circus act

Thursday, January 13, 2005

The only thing worse than the USDA’s timing in the announcement of new rules to permit Canadian live cattle and cow beef imports into the U.

Cork the bubbly: 2005 won’t be 2004

Thursday, January 6, 2005

When bidding my first, large freelance writing job decades ago, I telephoned an experienced friend for guidance.

More dollars and less conservation

Thursday, December 30, 2004

There is no shortage of American grain; current cash prices prove it.
Corn is marking time at $2, wheat hangs just above $3 and soybeans, at $5.

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