Stories by Sam Moore

Rusty Iron: Columnist still brings a chuckle, 60 years later

Thursday, December 8, 2011

In many of the weekly farm papers of the mid-1950s was a regular feature called The Song of the Lazy Farmer, which was a short and humorous observation on the passing scene, as well as the author’s troubles with his wife Mirandy over his laziness.

Yes, women have definitely come a long way

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Man works from sun to sun, but woman s work is never done. This old saying certainly applied to the average farm wife in the 1850s. A list of her tasks would reach from here to there. She had to spin — they needed wool cloth for warm clothes and linen for shirts and underwear. […]

Let’s Talk Rusty Iron: Relishing in the history of chickens

Thursday, November 10, 2011

Poultry and eggs are a big business and, although estimates vary, possibly as many as 45 billion chickens are eaten every year in this country, along with 75 billion eggs.

Let’s Talk Rusty Iron: Taking a look at the life of a farmer 50 years ago

Thursday, October 27, 2011

What were you doing 50 years ago? Our fathers and grandfathers, and maybe even we ourselves, were settling down after supper with the October issue of Farm Journal to find out what was going on.

Let’s Talk Rusty Iron: Readers share their tractor towing experiences

Thursday, October 13, 2011

The column a few weeks ago brought several responses about the fun experiences folks have had while towing or being towed on tractors. Here are two (somewhat edited for space) that I enjoyed.

Let’s Talk Rusty Iron: Cord automobile maker lives rags to riches story

Thursday, September 29, 2011

How many of you have seen a Cord automobile? Although the first Cord car was introduced in 1929, I don’t remember ever seeing one on the road when I was a boy, and I knew the name, and usually the model of virtually every car I saw.

Let’s Talk Rusty Iron: ‘It’s just a mile or so. You can just tow me.’

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Over the years, I’ve read many sad tales in the tractor magazines of towing adventures going comically wrong (often with a real potential for disaster), and I’ve a few such stories of my own.

How the 1940 Nash slipped through my hands

Thursday, August 11, 2011

As most of you don’t remember, my birthday falls early in August and I always wax a little nostalgic around this time. For a number of years, I’ve had a low grade itch to own an old car or truck, but hate to spend the money that people want for most of them.

Let’s Talk Rusty Iron: Catalog from 1894 gave advice to farm owners

Thursday, July 28, 2011

I have a reprint of The Country Gentleman’s Catalogue for 1894. Published in England, it was meant not for the English yeoman farmer who actually did the work, but for the “gentlemen” who owned those farms and estates.

Horse-powered equipment makes lots of progress

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Nancy and I just got back from Lancaster County, Pa., where I attended the 18th annual Horse Progress Days. This was the 16th consecutive year for me at the show, and the 2011 offering was as different as night and day from those early exhibitions back in the 1990s. Horse decline The use of horses […]

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About Sam

Sam Moore grew up on a family farm in Western Pennsylvania during the late 1930s and the 1940s. Although he left the farm in 1953, it never left him. He now lives near Salem, where he tinkers with a few old tractors, collects old farm literature, and writes about old machinery, farming practices and personal experiences for Farm and Dairy, as well as Farm Collector and Rural Heritage magazines. He has published one book about farm machinery, titled Implements for Farming with Horses and Mules.