Saturday, August 27, 2016

For the grazier, winter means dealing with cold temperatures, wind chill, freezing rain and mud. These weather conditions can negatively impact livestock performance and increase the energy requirement of the animal.

Change, no matter how uncomfortable, sometimes causes us to look at our operation and discover that there are more ways to do things than we believed possible.

Livestock graziers, now is a good time to finish what is left in your hay fields and then utilize forage in stockpiled areas.

For many years, OSU Extension has been conducting one- to five-day grazing schools throughout Ohio. In many cases OSU Extension, USDA/NRCS and local SWCD...

Infected fescue is insect, disease and drought resistant. It is also a nitrogen scavenger. This gives it an advantage over other forages, especially on poor soils.

The wet spring and early summer weather has led to many questions regarding hay quality and the factors beef producers should consider when planning their cow wintering programs.

After our county fair in August, Athens County hosted the Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council Beef Grazing Tour. One of the discussions during the tour centered on some patches of johnsongrass in a stockpiled field of fescue.

Proper soil nutrients are required for forage plants to maximize growth. Data indicates our forage plants use 20+ elements to live and grow. All...

Frequent rain has delayed first cutting hay harvest this spring. Unfortunately, delayed hay harvest has a direct negative impact on the value of forages. So how did the forage change?

here are several ways to supplement and extend the existing hay for the winter season.
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