Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Frost seeding of legumes in February and early March can be used to improve pasture quality and yield.

Nitrogen is generally the most limiting nutrient for plant growth and it is also one of the most expensive nutrients when purchased as a commercial fertilizer.

The 2006 Ohio Forage Performance Trial Report will be available very soon at Extension offices, but is available now on the Internet.

This winter is the most expensive period of livestock production. Cold, wet weather increases the nutrient requirements of farm animals and the grass has stopped growing.

Now is a time of year many cow-calf operators enjoy because the season's calf crop has been sold, all the hay has been made, most of the equipment is put away and there is a little extra money in the bank.

With many harvested small grain fields that weren't double cropped to soybeans now sitting idle, cattlemen still have an excellent opportunity to create high quality forages that may be grazed well into winter, and even next spring.

The month of August offers a window of great opportunities to get a jump on pasture planning and development.

Stockpiling fescue and orchardgrass is generally considered an economical way to extend the grazing season and cut feed costs.

Where are your livestock now? You are probably wondering what kind of question is that. Of course, we hope they're still in the field we put them into last.

We hear and see many reasons for improving our grazing practices. Reasons. Over the last several years, the federal government has also chosen to support and encourage grazing through the use of government programs.