Monday, November 30, 2015
The Dirt on Conservation

The Dirt on Conservation

Woodpeckers drill, peck, and drum to establish territory and attract mates, extract insects, and create nesting cavities.

It is not at all uncommon for folks to call the Soil and Water Conservation District office asking for help in addressing rapidly eroding streambanks.

There are definitely water quality issues in areas of Ohio that have been the driving force behind the movement to pass new regulations concerning manure and fertilizer applications. So what’s a farmer to do?

Come spring, salamanders are on the move.

When we look at a river or creek, we often neglect to look at the entire corridor — the area on both sides of the river or creek.

Before taking any steps to manage pond plants, it is important to first identify your objectives for the pond.

Talk of the quality of the water in our lakes and streams has been growing over the past several years, especially with regard to Harmful Algal Blooms.

Regardless of what those groundhogs had to say, spring arrives March 20.

Pipeline projects leave much to think about.

Winter time for natural resources professionals is something that I have taken to calling meeting season.