News

All Categories

  • Equipment companies showcase their newest at Farm Science Review

  • Can you make money with chestnuts? Learn how Nov. 6

  • American chestnut on the comeback trail

News Results

Professor says bigger churches aren’t always better

Thursday, May 3, 2001

According to a survey, churches in the United States are never going to be mega-churches, and according to a Emory University professor, shouldn’t try to be.

Bad accounting hurts social security

Thursday, May 3, 2001

J. Edward Ketz, associate professor of accounting in Penn State’s Smeal College of Business Administration, says nnless significant reforms are undertaken soon, a major consequence of government’s budget deceptions is that Social Security will be unable to pay retirees any benefits in 15 or so years.

‘Seven Sisters’ quilt made for raffle

Thursday, May 3, 2001

The 17th annual Panhandle Piecemakers Quilt Show will be held June 8-9 at the John D. Rockefeller Career Center in New Cumberland, W.Va.

Bigger isn’t always better when it comes to business mergers

Thursday, May 3, 2001

An international strategist who studies global mergers says megamergers between giants turn out like bad marriages instead of sound business deals.

Seven stories of love

Thursday, May 3, 2001

Marcia Millman explains seven stories of love in her newest book.

Blind climber takes on trip to top Everest

Thursday, May 3, 2001

Erik Weihenmayer will make history as he leaves Base Camp in his quest to become the first blind person to successfully reach the summit of Mount Everest.

Summer roundup heads to Wood County

Thursday, May 3, 2001

Tour stops include the Nichols Farm, J Bar A Herefords, Calvin Gerwin and Sons, Bill J. Bowling Farm, Larry and Becky Warns and Tom Dierksheide.

Consumer confidence tumbles in April

Thursday, May 3, 2001

The Conference Board’s Consumer Confidence Index tumbled nearly eight points in April.

Taking a look at the cattle market

Thursday, May 3, 2001

According to a Purdue University extension marketing specialist, the second half of the year appears to be bright.

Freeze, then rain, tough on corn crop

Thursday, May 3, 2001

Early planted corn in central Ohio got socked by the frost, then the rain.

Vegetative mulch retains rain

Thursday, May 3, 2001

As a cover crop, hairy vetch is better than plastic

German-imported cattle tested for BSE, all return negative

Thursday, May 3, 2001

As a safety precaution, the cattle, had been restricted to their premises in Texas since March 1997.

Taking a picture of the sheep industry

Thursday, May 3, 2001

Charles Parker, executive director of the National Seed Stock Alliance, spoke to members of the Ohio Heartland Sheep Improvement Association meeting at Smithville, Ohio.

Dodging the dodgeball debate

Thursday, May 3, 2001

In this week’s commentary, Editor Susan Crowell writes about the lessons she learned playing the game experts are now trying to root out of school sport.

Fighting foot-and-mouth disease.

Thursday, April 26, 2001

British scientists call for a form of rapid, preemptive slaughter known as “ring culling.”

Pork producers may post 2001 profits

Thursday, April 26, 2001

Kansas State University James Mintert expects cash hog prices in the benchmark Iowa-southern Minnesota market this year to average in the low $40s per hundredweight.

Horsin’ around just comes naturally for this crew

Thursday, April 26, 2001

Mahoning County’s newest 4-H club, The North Jackson Corral Crue started out a family affair, but now has 10 youth, ranging in age from 8 to 16.

Foot-and-mouth could still impact pork exports and prices

Thursday, April 26, 2001

According to Kansas State University agricultural economist James Mintert, “If foot-and-mouth becomes more widespread, it could provide a boost to U.S. pork exports,” Mintert said. “Conversely, if FMD enters the U.S., it could result in pork-importing countries restricting U.S. access to their markets.

Scientists develop phosphorus index to control runoff

Thursday, April 26, 2001

The index can be used to predict the risk of phosphorus runoff from pastures fertilized with animal manure or commercial fertilizers

It doesn’t sound or smell like a Harley!

Thursday, April 26, 2001

Harold Benich of Albion, Pa., has build a diesel powered motorcycle from genuine Harley-Davidson parts and a diesel engine scrapped from an old Miller welder. It smells like French-fried potatoes, and sounds like a tractor.

eNewsletter

Get our Top Stories in Your Inbox