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Let’s Talk Rusty Iron Results

Let’s Talk Rusty Iron: Taking a look at the life of a farmer 50 years ago

Thursday, October 27, 2011

What were you doing 50 years ago? Our fathers and grandfathers, and maybe even we ourselves, were settling down after supper with the October issue of Farm Journal to find out what was going on.

Let’s Talk Rusty Iron: Readers share their tractor towing experiences

Thursday, October 13, 2011

The column a few weeks ago brought several responses about the fun experiences folks have had while towing or being towed on tractors. Here are two (somewhat edited for space) that I enjoyed.

Let’s Talk Rusty Iron: Cord automobile maker lives rags to riches story

Thursday, September 29, 2011

How many of you have seen a Cord automobile? Although the first Cord car was introduced in 1929, I don’t remember ever seeing one on the road when I was a boy, and I knew the name, and usually the model of virtually every car I saw.

Let’s Talk Rusty Iron: ‘It’s just a mile or so. You can just tow me.’

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Over the years, I’ve read many sad tales in the tractor magazines of towing adventures going comically wrong (often with a real potential for disaster), and I’ve a few such stories of my own.

How the 1940 Nash slipped through my hands

Thursday, August 11, 2011

As most of you don’t remember, my birthday falls early in August and I always wax a little nostalgic around this time. For a number of years, I’ve had a low grade itch to own an old car or truck, but hate to spend the money that people want for most of them.

Let’s Talk Rusty Iron: Catalog from 1894 gave advice to farm owners

Thursday, July 28, 2011

I have a reprint of The Country Gentleman’s Catalogue for 1894. Published in England, it was meant not for the English yeoman farmer who actually did the work, but for the “gentlemen” who owned those farms and estates.

Horse-powered equipment makes lots of progress

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Nancy and I just got back from Lancaster County, Pa., where I attended the 18th annual Horse Progress Days. This was the 16th consecutive year for me at the show, and the 2011 offering was as different as night and day from those early exhibitions back in the 1990s. Horse decline The use of horses […]

The history of John Deere is long and windy

Thursday, June 30, 2011

Although they’d been reluctant to dive into the budding gasoline tractor business, there was increasing pressure from Deere’s branch houses and dealers, who wanted a tractor to sell.

Truck stops: Touring region’s auto museums

Thursday, June 16, 2011

The last week in May, I spent three days in northern Indiana. When I left, the fields around here were still too wet to get into and, although one usually sees dust clouds in every direction across northeastern Ohio and Indiana at this time of year, tractors and chisel plows and disks were all parked. […]

The Neys have it: Hay tools invented in Canton

Thursday, May 19, 2011

There were two different Ney companies in Canton in the late 1800s and early 1900s, both making hay tools such as barn hay forks, carriers and track.

Jeep, made for the Army, originated in Butler, Pa.

Thursday, May 5, 2011

Seventy years ago, the first of many millions of Jeeps saw the light of day. The origin of the sturdy little vehicles, which were universally used by all the allied armed forces during World War II and Korea, leads back to nearby Butler, Pa. The Austin automobile had been developed by Englishman Herbert Austin, who […]

Trucks now and then — they’ve come a long way

Thursday, April 21, 2011

Anyone tried to buy a new work truck lately? If you have, you’ve probably come to the realization that truck manufacturers don’t consider trucks to be work vehicles any more. They add so many amenities that the average pickup truck today is much more luxurious than a top of the line Cadillac was fifty years […]

Scratching the surface of the little Utilitor tractor

Thursday, April 7, 2011

Many years ago, Nancy and I attended a tractor show at Malabar Farm, probably put on by the Richland County Steam Threshers. Established by conservationist and author Louis Bromfield in 1939, and his home until he died in 1956, Malabar Farm is now an Ohio State Park. Finally! Anyway, in those days I had only […]

Some things do get better with time: home heating

Thursday, March 24, 2011

As a long, cold winter finally winds down, I was thinking about how comfortable most of us are in our homes with modem heating plants, thermo pane windows, and fully insulated walls and ceilings. Even though fuel costs have gone up, and will probably continue to climb, all we really have to do when we’re […]

Old newspaper gives glimpse of farm life in 1800s

Thursday, February 24, 2011

The state of agriculture in this country was still quite primitive in 1840, but many farmers were beginning to realize the farming practices of their fathers and grandfathers were long past their use-by-date. These progressive agriculturists were hungry to learn new ways of doing things and, to feed this hunger, there was a huge growth […]

Tractor pioneer remembered for his legacy

Thursday, February 10, 2011

On Jan. 2, 2011, at the ripe old age of 96, Harold Brock from Waterloo, Iowa, died peacefully at his home. So what, you ask? Design Well, because Harold Brock was in on the design phase of two of the most popular farm tractors in U.S. history — and for two completely different manufacturers. Harold […]

Columnist recounts visit to Ohio in mid-1800s

Thursday, January 13, 2011

Today we don’t think of Ohio as being “The West,” although it was 170 years ago. I have bound volumes of an Albany, N.Y. farm paper, called The Cultivator, from 1840 and 1841, that contain a series of Letters from the West. These were sent to the paper by a traveler from Onondaga County, New […]

Minnie, the red and gold reindeer, saved Christmas

Thursday, December 16, 2010

(Author’s Note: The following story is the only work of fiction I’ve ever written and was originally published in the Farm and Dairy on Dec. 24, 1992. I based my characters on real people: Lig, the elf who took care of the reindeer, was named for Dr. John Liggett, DVM. Sal, the Farmall advocate, after […]

Definition of a blue moon might surprise some

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Blue moon/you saw me standing alone/without a dream in my heart/without a love of my own. — Lyrics from a 1934 song by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart There was a full moon Nov. 21. No big deal, you say, there’s a full moon in most every month. However, this one is what the Maine […]

Honoring a friend is worth trek to Dyersville, Iowa

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Many years ago, not long after I got into the “Rusty Iron” hobby, I began to attend the annual show put on by the Northwest Pennsylvania Steam Engine & Old Equipment Association at their grounds in Portersville, Pa. I knew no one there, but there was one skinny guy who was always bustling around and […]

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