Be on time

My parents were very insistent that wherever we were going we should be on time. They set the example, and we learned by it.

There is always an exception of being late, and I’m sure we have all experienced that. However, whenever possible everyone should do their best to be on time.

To be on time demands discipline. You will never be on time if you don’t plan to be on time. It’s just as easy to be on time as it is to be late. The only difference is you must have a plan to be on time.

My son, Dale, has two clocks. He sets one on accurate time and the other he sets 15 minutes faster. He tells me it helps him to be on time for work.

My response to him was, “Well if it works for you then so be it.” I, by no means, recommend it for everyone; however, it works for him. If you are an on-time person, I’m sure you have a plan also. If it works for you, use it.

To be on time, it is essential to have a schedule and do your best to live by it. Being on time is a learning experience. Once we learn how to be on time, it becomes a way of life.

“Those who wish to transform the world must be able to transform themselves” (Konrad Heiden)

My father was railroad employee. He was a freight conductor. His pocket watch was inspected yearly for accurate time. His job called for time accuracy, and if you were late you were penalized. They insisted that being on time was of the utmost importance.

Let us all do our best to be on time all the time.

“Dost thou love life? Then do not squander time, for that is the stuff life is made of.” (Benjamin Franklin).

Think about it!

About the Author

George A. Hazlett is a retired minister in the Church of the Nazarene. He has written the weekly column, Think About it!, published weekly in Farm and Dairy for almost 28 years. He and his wife, Myrna, live in Hartville, Ohio. More Stories by George A. Hazlett

Leave a Comment

Receive emails as this discussion progresses.

eNewsletter

Get our Top Stories in Your Inbox

Recent News