Holmes County recognizes top dairy producers

WALNUT CREEK, Ohio — Good forage, good genetics and cow comfort equal good production, no matter where the dairy farm is located. That was the take-home message from the Holmes County Dairy Service Unit annual meeting at the Carlisle Inn in Walnut Creek.

“If we take care of the cows, they will take care of us,” said Matt Steiner.

Steiner and his family operate Pine Tree Dairy in Wayne County and he has also been involved in several mission projects in the Eastern European Union, assisting dairy producers in improving their herds, their milk production and increasing income for their families.

Steiner has been working with farmers in Kosovo, which is still recovering from economic and property damage suffered in 1990 when the country was at war with Serbia. Consequently, the infrastructure is challenged.

As a result Steiner and other U.S. farmers are working the counterparts to improve forage quality, help them find better genetics, improve cow comfort and help them find ways to process and market their milk.

Water quality

Roger Baker gave the dairy producers an update on water quality issues in the state, including the status of S.B. 150.  While some parts of the proposed program are voluntary, the nutrient management plan and records offer producers defense if there is a problem.

Production records

Holmes County had six herds ranked among the top herds in Ohio for production in 2013.

Hal and Rod Hunsberger had the high Holstein herd in the county for protein and energy corrected milk among herds over 100 cows with 29,195 pounds of milk, 1,122 pounds of fat, 897 pounds of protein and 30,936 pounds of energy corrected milk.

They also had the low SCC for herds over 100 cows.

Springwalk Farm Holsteins had the high herd over 100 cows for butterfat with 1,146 pounds of fat.

Highest producing

Doughty Valley Farm was the top herd over 100 cows for milk with 29,618 pounds of milk.

Doughty Valley Farm also had the top lifetime production cow in the county with 295,387 pounds of milk, 8,576 pounds of protein and 273,918 pounds of energy corrected milk in eight lactations.

Steven Beachy was recognized as the top Holstein herd under 100 cows for milk, protein and energy corrected milk, with 25,932 pounds of milk, 780 pounds of protein and 24,861 pounds energy corrected milk.

David and Effie Miller had the high Holstein herd for fat with 929 pounds of fat and were the most improved herd for fat with an increase of 71 pounds of fat, while Mead-Val Farms had the low SCC for herds under 100 cows.

Colored breeds

R N R Swiss & Lake Point Dairy had the high herd in the colored breeds over 100 cows for energy corrected milk, fat and protein, with 29,784 pounds of energy corrected milk, 834 pounds of protein and 1202 pounds of fat. They were also the most improved herd for fat with an increase of 202 pounds.

Steve Watts had the high herd in the colored breeds for milk with 24,828 pounds of milk.

Dar-Re Jerseys had the high herd for milk, fat, protein and energy corrected milk among the county’s colored breed herds under 100 cows with 21,321 pounds of milk, 1,074 pounds of fat, 786 pounds of protein, and 26,892 pounds of energy corrected milk.

Somatic cell count

Alan Kozak was recognized for the lowest somatic cell count for herds over 100 cows in the colored breeds and as the most improved herd over 100 cows with an increase of 3,348 pounds of energy corrected milk, 93 pounds of protein and 2,399 pounds of milk.

Margandale Farm was recognized as the most improved herd over 100 cows for reducing their SCC, while Dean Wolbolt was recognized as the most improved herd under 100 cows for reducing his SCC.

Mohler View Farms was recognized as the most improved herd under 100 cows for an increase of 1,361 pounds of milk, 1,708 pounds of energy corrected milk and 50 pounds of protein.

Spring Valley was recognized as the Low Somatic Cell herd under 100 cows. Butter Valley Jerseys had the top lifetime production cow for fat with 11,528 pounds of fat.

About the Author

Freelance writer Susan Mykrantz has been writing for Farm and Dairy since 1989. She is a graduate of the ag college at Ohio State University and also serves as editor of the "Ohio Jersey News." She lives in Wayne County. More Stories by Susan Mykrantz

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