LETTER: When counting your shale money, remember your local community

Editor:

It seems everywhere you go you hear or see something about the oil and gas phenomenon that is occurring in and around Columbiana County.

Testimonies of property owners getting checks well into the six- and seven-digit mark are plentiful. Overnight millionaires make Jed Clampett and the Beverly Hillbillies seem like a modern day reality show.

Preparedness is the strategy of the day from jobs, to skills, to food, lodging and housing.

I attended a recent luncheon meeting presented by Consumer’s Bank. Increased deposits are a sure sign leasing and royalty checks are being cashed.

Happy days are here again, so it would seem. It is my hope that, along with the new-found wealth, so too will be some old-fashioned help thy neighbor spirit and support your local charities attitude.

While we worry about sufficient infrastructure to support this oil and gas boom, let’s consider the day to day social infrastructure provided by numerous local non-profit organizations.

From Social Concerns, the Salvation Army, Community Foundations and the United Way to senior citizens, children, the developmentally and financially challenged, 4-H, theater and the arts, nature, history and preservation and abused and neglected adults, children and pets need more support.

Consider a tax-deductible donation to local 501(c)3 non-profit organizations as a strategy to relieve some of the tax consequences to the income that is being deposited into your lives.

Before you give, look for a local option for your charitable giving. Don’t just blindly donate, but ask to see financial records and spending habits along with a physical inspection of the operation.

Sadly, there are organizations that will take your money that do not have the proper credentials to make your gift tax-deductible. Ask your investment or tax professional for help when evaluating possibilities for your gift of giving.

Whatever the choice or size of the gift, look locally. Please give often. To whom much is given, much is expected.

Jenny Pike

Salem, Ohio

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