Shale impact fee could be a possibility in Ohio, too

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COLUMBUS — Drilling in the Marcellus shale is not new in Pennsylvania and it took some time to get an impact fee passed, so it has some wondering if Ohio could be next for such a fee.

Rob Nichols, press secretary for Ohio Gov. John R. Kasich, said an impact fee is under consideration for Ohio, but the state wants to make sure it moves forward cautiously.

“We need to consider such a law for Ohio,” said Nichols.

He said the laws governing the industry, such as the severance tax, were written long before anyone knew what was under the ground.

Nichols said the governor wants to find a way for all Ohioans to benefit from the shale, however, the governor is realistic and realizes there will be regulatory costs associated with the industry, and feels an impact fee could fund those needs.

“We have got to do this right. We take this very seriously,” said Nichols.

**** Read what some Pennsylvania counties and one township think about the Marcellus shale impact fee and what it means to the state. ****

About the Author

Kristy Foster Seachrist lives in Columbiana County raising sheep and horses. She earned her degree from Youngstown State University and has worked in both print and broadcast journalism. You can follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/fosterk96. More Stories by Kristy Foster Seachrist

One Comment

  1. Sam Johnson says:

    This is an absurd proposal. First of all, we all need to realize the fact that these companies are hear now because of confiscatory taxation and politics in New York State, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. There is nothing that says that they must stay here. The State of Ohio is already set to make a HUGE windfall in tax revenues because of the drilling now underway. Bonus payments, rents, royalties, and production profits are all NEW taxable income which is rushing in to the state treasury at an unprecedented rate. With the 66,000 jobs to be created in this state, unemployment cost to the state will go down, welfare cost will go down,etc. So for the state and its residents this is already a win win situation which could balance the state budget, even produce surpluses! The entire State is and will benefit. But if you raise taxes too much they will leave. Ohio was once the home of the largest Oil company in the world, now they are gone, WHY?

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