Wednesday, November 25, 2015
Let's Talk Rusty Iron

Let's Talk Rusty Iron

Those pioneer cabins were small, but efficient.

My Christmas column this year is, as they say on the air, an “encore presentation,” having appeared in December of both 1995 and 2000. How...

About half a mile from the one-room school I attended was a saw mill that was owned by a farmer named Harvey Smith, and that was operated by Smith and his oldest son, Harold.

I don’t claim to be “restoring” a tractor, as to me that means making it exactly as it was when new, an almost impossible undertaking unless one has unlimited funds.

Folks in the latter half of the 19th century went through an unpleasant ritual along about this time of year, or probably a little earlier in Northern climes, called “putting up the parlor stove.”

Miss Nancy and I, along with my little sister B.G. Theiss who is visiting from North Carolina, enjoyed the afternoon at the Farm and Dairy’s recent 100th Anniversary open house at the Salem Community Center.

There are many, many pumpkin pies bought or made from scratch and served at American tables around this time of year.

Traveling in this country during the 16th and 17th centuries was difficult in the extreme.

On February 23, 1929, Charles City, Iowa, residents read startling news in the Charles City Daily Press: There was to be a $50 million merger between the Hart-Parr Company, one of the city’s major firms, the Oliver Plow Works and Nichols & Shepard Company.
The Whippet automobile

Folks often ask how I think of stuff to write about, and while I sometimes really have to scratch to come up with a subject, especially when a deadline is breathing down my neck, things I see in my travels often trigger a memory that leads to an idea for a story.