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Scott Shalaway Results

Black squirrels can create identification problem

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Love ‘em or hate ‘em, everyone knows squirrels. “Squirrels,” however, is a generic term. I use it here to refer to game species — gray, fox and red squirrels. These are the three species of tree squirrels that most eastern state wildlife agencies recognize as game species. To confuse the issue just a bit, some […]

Tennessee approves first sandhill crane hunt

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Recently Tennessee’s Fish & Wildlife Commission approved the state’s first modern day sandhill crane hunt. It will run from Nov. 28 through Jan. 1. A drawing for 400 permits will be held Oct. 19. Sandhill cranes are a large (4 feet tall and 6- to 7-foot wingspan, 7 to 10 pounds), charismatic species that birders […]

Are some birds too small to hunt?

Thursday, August 29, 2013

My first night at Boy Scout summer camp many years ago, I was rousted from my sleeping bag to go on a snipe hunt. It was just a ploy to get first timers lost in the woods at night. Older scouts oversaw the event to be sure no one really got lost, and I learned […]

A duck stamp for every hunter and every birder

Thursday, August 15, 2013

At $15, a “Duck Stamp” is arguably the best investment a conservationist can make. More formally called the “Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp,” the Duck Stamp was created in 1934. Hunters lobbied for this “tax” on themselves to ensure that waterfowl would forever fill the skies. A supplement to a state hunting license, […]

Another banner year reported for bald eagles

Thursday, August 8, 2013

Recovering an endangered species requires legal protection, habitat, motivated staff, funding and time. Sometimes it can take decades for a species to recover. When a species has an extended reproductive period and breeds only once each year, time will be the limiting factor in the species’ recovery. Consider, for example, bald eagles in Pennsylvania. In […]

Growing numbers: Ducks’ dynasty improving

Thursday, August 1, 2013

North America’s duck populations stable or improving.

Some summer insects not to swat

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Summer time is insect time. Unfortunately, stinging and biting species such as wasps and mosquitoes get most of our attention for all the wrong reasons. Many insects are beneficial, and most are benign. My favorite summer insects are hummingbird moths. I know they have begun to emerge because digital images from readers arrive almost daily. […]

Monster to neighbor — attitudes about snakes

Thursday, July 18, 2013

A few weeks ago I wrote about snakes and why they’re good to have around. I urged readers to protect them rather than kill them on sight. I expected a fury of letters from snake haters. I was pleasantly surprised to get no such mail. This is the first time I’ve written about snakes that […]

The Warbler Guide: A comprehensive resource

Thursday, July 11, 2013

It’s not often I devote an entire column to a single new book, but The Warbler Guide, by Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle (2013, Princeton University Press, $29.95, to be published July 24) deserves such attention. At 560 pages, The Warbler Guide thoroughly covers all 56 species of North American warblers. The first 137 pages […]

The best and worst of summer, through plants

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

The best of summer comes from the garden or a roadside produce stand; the worst lurks in our backyards. My favorite summer garden foods are watermelon, cantaloupe and sweet corn. Explorers introduced melons to North America in the 16th century. Watermelons originated in Africa; cantaloupes came from Persia. A perfect watermelon is ripe, sweet, and […]

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