Greene County, Pa., Marcellus shale well hits record levels

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PITTSBURGH — CNX Gas Corporation reported that its first horizontal Marcellus shale well is now producing at a rate of 6.5 million cubic feet (MMcf) per day.

This is a record daily production rate for any well in the company’s history and is believed to be among the highest reported by any Marcellus shale producer.

Well details

The well, located in Greene County, Pa., began flowing into the sales meter on October 2, with an initial production rate of 1.2 MMcf per day and 4,000 pounds of backpressure. The backpressure on the well had been gradually reduced since then, allowing daily production to increase to about 4 MMcf per day.

On Dec. 12, the installation of new surface equipment enabled the well to flow at the 6.5 MMcf per day rate, with pressure still being held at 2,640 pounds.

Cumulative production from the well prior to last Friday was 106 MMcf.

According to Nicholas J. DeIuliis, president and chief executive officer, the well was drilled to a vertical depth of 8,140 feet in the Huntersville Chert, penetrating 83 vertical feet of Marcellus shale.

The well was logged, then plugged back, and a horizontal section of 3,395 feet was cut for a total measured depth of 10,738 feet.

No royalty

CNX Gas has a 100 percent working interest in the well and a 100 percent net revenue interest because CNX Gas does not pay a royalty.

Because of the gathering infrastructure already in place from its CBM operations, CNX Gas was able to place the well online immediately after retrieving frac fluids.

CNX Gas is currently drilling its second vertical Marcellus Shale well and will be shortly hydraulically fracturing its second and third horizontal wells.

11 Comments

  1. jeff kerr says:

    where at in greene co. is this well

  2. mildred carpenter(heir to Riggs Estate) says:

    I owned land in greene county Pa….sold land to Consol (CNX) and kept the royalties. They said they were going to drill for gas and oil. We have heard nothing. Now, I read this article and I am a little confused. It says CNX does not pay royalties….they are going to pay us our royalties from our wells in Greene County that they drill.

  3. mildred carpenter(heir to Riggs Estate) says:

    If they say they drilled one of the most prosperous wells in Greene County, Pa,,,by Windrige, all along riggs road, that was our property…We should get some royalties from that well?

  4. okiestorm1 says:

    If you have leased your mineral rights and you are in that section where they are drilling you will get your money,,if you are not in that maped out section you will not get the money..you need to check and read your contract with the company you leased your mineral rights to,you should of gotten a map of the section you are in..

  5. okiestorm1 says:

    and just because you own the property, if you don’t own the minerals and did not lease your property for drilling you will not get the money from drilling,,the one who owns the mineral rights will.

  6. Debra PENNELL says:

    My sisters and I were contacted a couple of weeks ago cause apparently our grandfather bought the mineral rights to a couple of parcels in Greene County. This happened in 1939. Its all new to us but we are learning more each day. I am interested in the royalties to leave to my children. I have always been an environmentalist and science teacher for 24 yrs. I was born in Washington, and my parents and grandparents are buried in Claysville and Greensburg. Above everything else, I do not want to contaminate or ruin anyones property or water. If you have any useful information please let me know. Thanks so much. Sincerely, Debra pennell

    • E Strum says:

      Get your deeds for the purchase from courthouse and see Smith/Butz in Canonsburg. They will negotiate a lease for you to protect the surface, get you a great deal, and charge an hourly rate only.
      File an estate plan in that county to prevent a landowner from taking your mineral rights thru a quiet of title action.
      This info I am giving you is very important.

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