Stories by Mark Landefeld

It takes nutrients to grow forage

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Proper soil nutrients are required for forage plants to maximize growth. Data indicates our forage plants use 20+ elements to live and grow. All are equally important for growth, but vary greatly in amounts needed. Of these, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium are usually required in the largest amounts followed by calcium, magnesium, and sulfur. These […]

Pointers for grazing in wet weather

Thursday, May 5, 2011

With the 2011 grazing season underway I imagine everyone is moving livestock to new paddocks on a regular basis by now. It has been extremely wet in our area so it’s been a challenge to rotate livestock to areas where grass is growing without pugging soils and damaging the sod base in those paddocks. Suggestions […]

Important tips on beef cow forages and mineral supplementation

Thursday, February 3, 2011

We often talk about forage quality factors such as percent protein and amount of total digestible nutrients when we look at how good a forage is for a particular group of livestock and if it meets their nutritional needs. Seldom however, are vitamins and minerals in a forage for beef cows even mentioned in the […]

Planning ahead with your grazing strategies: Fall is fast approaching

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Now that summer is under way, many producers are finishing first cutting hay and preparing to make second cutting. As rotational graziers, however, we should already be thinking about preparations for the fall and winter and how we will feed our livestock after forage growth has stopped. Stockpiling While it may be a little early […]

Grazing in spring’s new grass can lead to livestock disease

Thursday, April 8, 2010

The ground has firmed tremendously in our area the last two weeks and warm temperatures have launched grass growth again in most fields so that pasture rotations may be started. As daylight lengthens, weather warms and pastures grow, farm managers should be aware of the term hypomagnesemia or “grass tetany.” Turning cows or sheep out […]

Feed them right: Proper nutrition vital for beef cows during winter months

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Feeding beef cattle during the winter can be a challenging experience if being profitable is one of your goals. Proper nutrition is a key component for a successful cow/calf operation. Cows go through many physiological changes during a year. The winter/early spring feeding period is one of the most critical times to provide adequate nutrition […]

Should you feed hay now or wait?

Thursday, October 1, 2009

There are a limited number of days left in our growing season here in Ohio and the opportunity to increase your dry matter as stored feed or stockpiled feed before winter is winding down quickly. The plants your livestock graze the next few weeks will impact those plants’ growth not only now, but possibly next […]

Managing tall fescue in pastures

Thursday, June 11, 2009

Many pastures in Ohio contain tall fescue as one of the cool-season plants which make up our pasture’s mix. Tall fescue is a persistent perennial bunchgrass that adapts to a wide range of conditions. It is tolerant of low pH, poor soil drainage and can endure drought situations well. Tall fescue adapts to most Ohio […]

Mean temperatures keeping cows lean

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

Some cows I’ve seen lately look thinner than normal for this time of year. With more than a month of winter remaining, it could mean trouble for producers as calving time approaches. We’ve had colder than normal temperatures, combined with a longer than normal continuous cold spell in our part of the state and this […]

Winter grazing may be right for you

Thursday, November 27, 2008

The lack of adequate rainfall in our area this summer and fall left many producers with less forage than they would like, but that doesn’t mean they are all feeding hay yet. If you do not have forage left for livestock to graze at this time of year you may want to reconsider some of […]


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About Mark

The author is an Ohio State University Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Educator in Monroe County, Ohio.