Energy independence is at the top of the list at Pa. oil and gas conference

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PITTSBURGH, Pa. — Pennsylvania is moving in the right direction — that was the feeling speakers shared at the Pennsylvania Independent Oil and Gas Association’s Eastern Oil and Gas Conference held May 13.

Lt. Governor Jim Cawley described the United States as being in an energy revolution and the Marcellus shale is one component of it, helping curb the appetite for foreign fuel.

“We should rejoice that we are once again leading the way in energy creation. We are on our way,” said Cawley.

He said pipelines are being constructed across the state in order to get the natural gas to where it needs to go, including processing plants. He said $1.5 million is being spent on just one mile of pipeline in Pennsylvania.

Cawley said Pennsylvania should do whatever it needs to in order to facilitate development.

“We get it, we’re behind in developing infrastructure,” said Cawley.

Cawley said that more than 200,000 indirect jobs are being impacted, created or made better by the shale. He said 30,000 directly impacted jobs are being created.
He also fought back against those trying to stop fracking in Pennsylvania. He said it would mean job and economic loss in

Pennsylvania and not necessarily end up protecting the environment.

“We all want to protect the air we breathe. We all want to protect the public safety,” said Cawley.

Cawley also touched on the subject of forced pooling in Pennsylvania, but would not say whether the governor’s office is on one side or the other. He called it a blend of issues regarding property issues, conservation and the environment.

Cawley said forced pooling is considered to be better for the environment because it means fewer well pads and less land disturbance.

“However, we live in the United States where property rights are sacred,” said Cawley.

He added the jury is still out on the issue and both sides have valid points.

To read what other legislative topics were discussed at the PIOGA Eastern Oil and Gas Conference, check this link out.

About the Author

Kristy Foster Seachrist lives in Columbiana County raising sheep and horses. She earned her degree from Youngstown State University and has worked in both print and broadcast journalism. You can follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/fosterk96. More Stories by Kristy Foster Seachrist

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