Electric cars in rural America

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electric vehicles

DENVER — Urban centers across the country are experiencing strong growth in electric vehicles, driven by high customer satisfaction and financial subsidies.

However, the same level of interest has not translated to rural America, where range anxiety is a valid concern according to a new report from CoBank’s Knowledge Exchange Division.

Rural

Until electric vehicles can travel a minimum of 200 miles on a single charge and are priced similar to internal combustion engine vehicles, adoption in rural communities will likely remain muted.

“By 2025, penetration of EVs in rural America is expected to remain below 1 percent, but by the time it reaches 3 percent of new car sales in rural America, technology will be much better than it is today,” said Taylor Gunn, lead economist with CoBank.

“Some rural electric cooperatives will have customers on the edge of urban and suburban America and may want to consider building public infrastructure. But for now, most rural electric cooperatives are unlikely to realize material growth in EVs, limiting any near-term EV-related growth in electricity sales.”

Future

Future advances in battery technology will mean that EVs will travel hundreds of miles on a single charge, thereby reducing driver’s dependency on public charging infrastructure and reducing the costs shouldered by rural electric distribution cooperatives when deploying this infrastructure.

“When and if EV penetration rates justify a system-wide charging network, improved battery and charging technology will provide significant savings for the cost of this infrastructure to rural electric cooperatives,” said Gunn.

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1 COMMENT

  1. Oh, how wrong…
    The advantages of EVs will come to rural America too…
    “Until electric vehicles can travel a minimum of 200 miles on a single charge and are priced similar to internal combustion engine vehicles, adoption in rural communities will likely remain muted.”
    Newer and newer models with over 300 mile range and lower cost will be coming out. Initial cost means much less in the long run. With 30 moving parts instead of 2,000 will mean less repairs. EV will have a much lower cost.
    “Some rural electric cooperatives will have customers on the edge of urban and suburban America and may want to consider building public infrastructure. But for now, most rural electric cooperatives are unlikely to realize material growth in EVs, limiting any near-term EV-related growth in electricity sales.”
    All that you need is a plug and a cheap EV charger AT HOME. Wire it up or plug it in. If you own an electric dryer or have a 220V outlet you have everything that you need to charge and run an EV.
    ““When and if EV penetration rates justify a system-wide charging network, improved battery and charging technology will provide significant savings for the cost of this infrastructure to rural electric cooperatives,” said Gunn.”
    AGAIN. With solar and batteries you might not even need a “rural electric cooperative” If you have electric in your home you plug in your charger and run your EV.
    ““When and if EV penetration rates justify a system-wide charging network, improved battery and charging technology will provide significant savings for the cost of this infrastructure to rural electric cooperatives,” said Gunn.”
    When disruptive technology hits the “tipping point” change happens VERY FAST! Always does.
    The disappearing infrastructure will be you local gas station.
    Remember with an EV and a charger, you will have a full tank EVERY MORNING!

    “But for now, most rural electric cooperatives are unlikely to realize material growth in EVs, limiting any near-term EV-related growth in electricity sales.”
    With solar and storage dropping self generation will be much more used.
    ““By 2025, penetration of EVs in rural America is expected to remain below 1 percent, but by the time it reaches 3 percent of new car sales in rural America, technology will be much better than it is today,” said Taylor Gunn, lead economist with CoBank. ”
    “Experts” often have it VERY WRONG when it comes to disruptive technology. Often 100 X wrong.

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