U.S. farmers reduced winter wheat plantings over last year

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WASHINGTON — Farmers made critical decisions last fall while they had bins full of wheat from record-breaking yields with prices near ten-year lows.

Therefore, it is no surprise that many farmers chose to decrease their winter wheat planted area, said Stephanie Bryant-Erdmann, U.S. wheat market analyst.

USDA’s 2017-2018 winter wheat seeding report, released Jan. 12, reported U.S. farmers planted the second lowest number of winter wheat acres on record and 10 percent fewer acres than 2016-2017.

Reduced acres

USDA estimated U.S. farmers planted 32.4 million acres (13.1 million hectares) of winter wheat with reductions for all three classes of winter wheat — HRW, soft red winter (SRW) and white winter wheat.

USDA assessed HRW planted area at 23.3 million acres (9.43 million hectares), down 12 percent from 2016. Planted area in Kansas, the number one U.S. HRW-producing state at 7.40 million acres (3 million hectares), is down 13 percent from 2016 and 20 percent below the 5-year average.

Nebraska farmers planted a new record low area to winter wheat of just 1.09 million acres (441,000 hectares), 25 percent below the 5-year average. Total SRW planted area of 5.68 million acres (2.30 million hectares) fell 6 percent from 2016.

Minor increases

Increases in Delaware, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina and South Carolina were not enough to offset decreases in most of the other SRW-producing states, including a 16 percent decline in Ohio, the No. 1 producer of U.S. SRW in 2016-2017.

Ohio farmers

USDA believes Ohio farmers planted 490,000 acres (198,000 hectares) of SRW, 15 percent below the five-year average. White winter wheat planted area decreased to 3.37 million acres (1.36 million hectares), down 4 percent from 2016/17.

Exportable soft white wheat supplies are concentrated in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Planted area in Idaho and Oregon fell 4 percent and 3 percent, respectively.

Idaho farmers planted 730,000 acres (295,000 hectares) compared to 760,000 acres (308,000 hectares) in 2015/16 and 2016/17.

Planted area in Oregon dropped 20,000 acres (8,000 hectares) from 2016/17 to 700,000 acres (283,000 hectares), while planted area in Washington remained stable year over year at 1.70 million acres (688,000 hectares).

Durum planting in the Southwestern U.S. is estimated at 140,000 acres (56,700 hectares), down 8 percent from 2016-2017 and 38 percent below 2015-2016. According to USDA, planting is well underway in Arizona at 22 percent complete, up 8 percentage points from the same date last year.

Delays from wet conditions are slowing progress in California. Arizona and California plant durum from December through January for harvest in May through July. With the decrease in planted area in the U.S., customers should pay close attention to weather maps and consider purchasing further out to protect themselves from supply shocks.

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