Tuesday, November 24, 2015

More than 95 percent of weeds can be controlled through good management practices.

Frost seeding of legumes in February and early March can be used to improve pasture, hay quality and yield. The freezing and thawing of late winter and early spring can provide for good legume seed/soil contact and germination.

This is the time of year to evaluate your hay and pasture fields to determine if they need to be reseeded. First and foremost, you need to make sure the pH and fertility is adequate for the forages you want to plant. If it is not, the new seeding could germinate then die or never produce to its potential.

For the grazier, winter means dealing with cold temperatures, wind chill, freezing rain and mud. These weather conditions can negatively impact livestock performance and increase the energy requirement of the animal.

Change, no matter how uncomfortable, sometimes causes us to look at our operation and discover that there are more ways to do things than we believed possible.

Livestock graziers, now is a good time to finish what is left in your hay fields and then utilize forage in stockpiled areas.

For many years, OSU Extension has been conducting one- to five-day grazing schools throughout Ohio. In many cases OSU Extension, USDA/NRCS and local SWCD...

Infected fescue is insect, disease and drought resistant. It is also a nitrogen scavenger. This gives it an advantage over other forages, especially on poor soils.

The wet spring and early summer weather has led to many questions regarding hay quality and the factors beef producers should consider when planning their cow wintering programs.

After our county fair in August, Athens County hosted the Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council Beef Grazing Tour. One of the discussions during the tour centered on some patches of johnsongrass in a stockpiled field of fescue.