Thursday, November 26, 2015

When I think of all the years of my youth I wasted worrying about being popular, why, I could just weep.

The wind died down around 2 p.m. Monday, Aug. 29. In that lull, Mississippi dairyman Bucky Jones scrambled out to the barn to milk his 80 Holsteins.

mages of Hurricane Katrina's destruction blast from our televisions pierced us with secondhand sorrow.

After reading and searching the Internet, I found some interesting and practical information to help dairy managers and nutritionists evaluate ration management based on hoof health and appearance.

As Hurricane Katrina's smashing blows fell on the Gulf Coast, commodity traders did what they always do when uncertainty hits the pits: They sold.

Have you ever been driving along, listening to the radio, when a song comes on that simply takes you back to a day, a moment in time, a place you never thought you would be again? I have experienced that same incredible jolt at times when looking at treasured photographs.

There is a certain, delicious agony in failing first grade. Granted, it's virtually impossible to really flunk out on the second day of school, but me, I'm an overachiever.

No matter how much we plan ahead at our house, it seems those plans always change. I choke back some frustration, let the rest of it torture the eardrums of my family in heated words, and tell myself to stay flexible.

The end of central Illinois' heat-stoked, rain-starved summer is being whispered in the yellow leaves rattling on my backyard's black walnut trees.

I have a big question for all farmers out there. Who among you could possibly farm without the following agricultural essentials: baler twine, duct tape and a tarp strap or two.