Harvest update with Robert Cope

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ALLIANCE, Ohio — Robert Cope, owner of Cope Farm Equipment has been farming in Columbiana County, Ohio, since 1979. Since then, he and his wife, Stephanie, have bought two other farms in the area, now own a total of 150 acres on which they grow soybeans and wheat.

Cope’s father, Alan Cope, bought the John Deere dealership in Alliance from the John Denny family in 1966. They have grown, now owning dealerships in Austinburg and Kinsman.

Cope recalls a dry August this year, causing some bean pods not to have fully developed. He also notes local farmers are just getting in the fields to harvest corn, estimating 10 percent is harvested so far.

The dealerships offer more than farm equipment including a complete line of Stihl handheld products such as weed wackers. They also have John Deere lawn tractors, including zero turn mowers and compact tractors.

Cope’s also has parts on hand and offers on-site service for farm machinery repair.

He is now finished with his harvest and looks forward to assisting in keeping other farmers’ equipment running through the harvest season.

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Harvest season safety tips

  • Never allow children to ride as extra passengers on tractors, lawn mowers or other farm equipment.
  • Do not let a young person operate a tractor unless they are mature enough, have the physical capability and are versed in operational safety.
  • Fall harvest and texting do not mix, turn your cell phone to TTYL (talk to you later).
  • Bin safety: Review rules prior to harvest.
  • All augers and grain-moving equipment should be turned off before anyone enters a bin.
  • Moist grain can form toxic gases and fumes. Bins should be checked for these gases before entering.
  • Never go alone into a bin If you must enter the bin, use a secure body harness lifeline.


 

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Katy Mumaw is a graduate of Ohio State University where she studied agricultural communications and Oklahoma State University earning her master's in agricultural leadership. The former Farm and Dairy reporter enjoys family time and sharing the stories of agriculture.

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