Returning to the “roots” of agriculture could help current problems

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no-till manure spreader

An opinion column published by Albuquerque Journal discusses the potential benefits of returning to early twentieth century farm practices like fertilizing with manure, composting, using no-till practices and other approaches.

Based on social responsibility and a desire to combat global warming, some of today’s young farmers are adopting these methods in an attempt to build carbon levels in soil. This is accomplished by creating humus, a dark soil that’s beneficial to plants, helps to prevent soil erosion and might slow down climate change.

From Albuquerque Journal:

“Building humus is a great way to sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide in the soil for potentially long periods of time, which means that “old” practices can address “new” challenges, such as climate change.”

Via: Albuquerque Journal > Agriculture needs to take a few steps back, forget modern styles

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