Soil bacteria could help farmers grow more crops

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soil in hands

Believe it or not, the thing that could change farming isn’t the climate or a new piece of equipment. According to National Geographic, a microbe in the soil could be the key to helping farmers grow more crops.

Named Streptomyces thermoautotrophicus, this soil bacteria can convert nitrogen into something usable by plants and also fertilize soil.

Researchers are searching for the bacteria since it seemingly disappeared over ten years ago. A group of scientists have searched a coal seam in Centralia, Pennsylvania for the bacteria since it thrives in hot soil caused by an underground mine fire in the 1960s. If rediscovered, biological engineers will work to engineer the bacteria into plants.

Via: National Geographic > Why tiny microbes mean big things for farmers

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Katie Woods grew up in Columbiana, Ohio. Katie likes reading, writing, enjoying the outdoors and DIY projects.

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