Sunday, May 1, 2016

Life on dairy farms in the 1970s proved to be a very good time, indeed. I was too young to know it, but I recall the feeling that things were going well.

Television in the 1970s gave us The Six Million Dollar Man, starring Lee Majors. As the show's opening announcer told us each week, Majors was: "Steve Austin, astronaut.

Every fence or barn built by a rancher, every tractor purchased by a farmer is an act of faith in the future because that fence, barn or tractor is an investment in 20, 30, maybe even 50 years of tomorrows.

Technologically speaking, my family and I have always been more Luddite than early-adopter. We are not the first people on the block to have high-speed this or digital that.

When I'm asked how I do it all, I wonder if all is probably assumed to include keeping a nice, neat house where I can find everything, and everything's in its place.

Sounds like something from an old almanac, but I just made it up. While some calves seemingly do get a long and fluffy hair coat overnight, the more important cue of that chill for calf feeders is to feed baby calves more.

Not all gifts come wrapped in ribbons and bows. There is no gift like peace of mind for those who are embattled and bone-tired.

Over the past year, there have been many articles that have discussed practices to improve pasture productivity, and those that have a positive influence on the environment.

For the past five years, Farm and Dairy has sponsored a holiday writing contest for youth and adults.

'Tis the warm-wish sending season; the once-a-year time when family, friends and former neighbors post colorful cards and newsy letters to the lovely Catherine and me detailing their lives since last Christmas.
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