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Your turn: Some readers can really write

Thursday, May 12, 2005

Thirteen years ago this week a thin packet containing four agricultural columns hit the cluttered desks of 124 newspaper editors and publishers in 14 Midwestern states.

One Little Thing and Life in a Small Town

Thursday, May 12, 2005

It strikes me as peculiar how one little thing can change the course of our existence so quickly. Some of life’s greatest tragedies occur in a mere second, altering everything that follows.

No fun to be inside on a May day

Thursday, May 12, 2005

Friends seem puzzled by the fact that I know very little about television hit shows from my childhood era.

More fun than you can shake a stick at

Thursday, May 5, 2005

I firmly believe that when mothers compare notes on childbirth this can only be because they have not yet experienced the pain and sheer endurance that a 6-year-old’s birthday party entails.

Seeing the future of animal ID

Thursday, May 5, 2005

While most U.S. beef producers are having a hard time coming to grips with livestock traceability, a Japanese cattle company is taking animal ID to the next level.

Broken promises of rural development

Thursday, May 5, 2005

It happened again the other week at a local public forum on agriculture.
The panel of speakers included me, two farmers and a state Farm Bureau economist.

Have To Sit? Might As Well Knit

Thursday, May 5, 2005

I first spotted the recent fad, a yarn manufacturer’s dream, when sisters entered the Next to New Shop where I work part-time.

Edison was a classroom nuisance

Thursday, May 5, 2005

Consider for a moment some of the amazing Americans who shaped the development of history. Henry Ford, Thomas Edison, Charles Kettering, Marie Curie, Charles Lindberg are a few who come to mind quite readily.

Columbiana County sentinel plot will track spread of soybean rust

Thursday, April 28, 2005

In response to the appearance of Phakospora pachyrhizi, or soybean rust, in the United States, the USDA developed a federal, state, university and industry framework for surveillance, reporting, prediction and management of soybean rust for the 2005 growing season.

Environmental economics is muddy

Thursday, April 28, 2005

These days, everyone wants a say in how you manage the natural resources of your land.
Your water, your soil, your manure, your air – you’re bombarded from all sides with input.

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