Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Many things in life require more tenacity than most humans want to conjure, from sunup to sundown, day in and day out.

Necessity is the mother of invention. No one knows that more than the American farmer. One day recently, my son put on an old pair of his dad's coveralls and was frustrated when he realized one of the lower leg zippers was broken, leaving the leg flapping open in the breeze.

How does one define a life well lived? There are many people who would base this answer on the amount of money one has in the bank, or the vehicles parked in the garage or the number of vacations a fellow can afford in a year.

My recent column about snow days prompted a few comments from friends and readers, almost all saying snow days were meant for sledding.

Last night, I did some serious farming. Santa Claus had brought me a silo filled with farm animals and fencing and it had not yet been opened.

One of the great advantages of growing up on a large farm is the thrill of being surrounded by all of God's creatures.

I couldn't help but laugh one day last week when a high school girl told me she was praying for a snow day just in time for semester exams.

I have been surprised by the feedback I have received from last week's column regarding the decades-old murder of two brothers and their ever-watchful English Shepherd.

Very few things passed down to me from my paternal grandparents, unfortunately, survived our house fire of December 2000.

As we close the door on another year, we start a new blank slate - anything is possible. I have always looked at a new year with eyes wide open to new possibilities and a hopeful heart.
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