Thursday, September 20, 2018
Let's Talk Rusty Iron

Let's Talk Rusty Iron

During the years of World War I and after, at least until the severe agricultural depression of 1921, tractor manufacturers and wannabes, as well as not a few charlatans who only hoped to sell stock in non-existent tractor companies, were thick on the ground, especially in the Midwest.

There were two different Ney companies in Canton in the late 1800s and early 1900s, both making hay tools such as barn hay forks, carriers and track.

This week I’m going to attempt to kill two birds with one bush – er, that’s not right – but you get the idea....

A short history of the rise and fall of Benham, Kentucky.

(Author’s note: This is an “encore” presentation of this column, which was first published in 2002.) Christmas on the western Pennsylvania farm where I grew...

As some of you may have gathered, I have an extensive collection of old farm magazines from the 1930s, '40s, and '50s. I like...
1909 International Harvester Auto Wagon

This week is the rest of a list of what I consider to be the 10 most significant new developments in agricultural machinery during the 19th century and the first half of the 20th.

Old wills, and I mean really old wills, are fascinating to read. They're a way to learn about how our ancestors lived, as well as seeing what worldly goods were important to them.

I’ve often heard it said that “what goes around comes around” and “there’s nothing new under the sun.” Here’s an example of that, and,...

About half a mile from the one-room school I attended was a saw mill that was owned by a farmer named Harvey Smith, and that was operated by Smith and his oldest son, Harold.
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