Saturday, December 5, 2020

The surprise came from two words cropping up in the exit poll reports. Moral values. The election was hinging on moral values.

When Rick Schnieders was 10, his first job was bagging potatoes at his father's small grocery store in Iowa.

Growing up, my sister Carol and I turned just about every corner of our parents' 98 acres into our own personal playhouse.

It's been more than three years since Sept. 11, 2001. And each day, our focus on that horrendous tragedy blurs.

Made in America. We've all known for a long time that the U.S. consumer is two-faced. We say we want to support local produce growers but, golly, those Wal-Mart green peppers are cheaper.

Does it matter to farmers who wins in November? We'd know more if we knew where they stood on the farm issues.

U.S. Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, backed away from offering a controversial ag amendment to the appropriations bill last week, but he hasn't given up the fight.

I have a new name. I haven't heard it here at work (yet), but I hear it nonstop at home. One day, I turned on my cellular phone and there it was, staring at me for just a second before the system booted up: Freak.

As November's election nears, U.S. presidential candidates are criss-crossing the country to woo rural America, particularly Ohio.

In June, a statewide task force in Minnesota released its Animal Agriculture Industry Report. It's 60 pages, but it's good reading.